Coffee Chats

Join Us for Coffee Chats

Grab a favorite beverage and join colleagues and neighbors for timely, informal conversations devoted to a range of topics related to community-engaged teaching and learning. Together, participants will generate and respond to questions that impact community and student outcomes as well as issues that shape us as educators, whole persons, and practitioner-scholars.  

Coffee Chats also provide a chance for participants to expand their support networks, finding others outside their own departments with shared interests and providing the group access to the practical wisdom in the room.

Topics vary monthly. All are welcome. 

Want to suggest a topic or facilitate an upcoming coffee chat? Send a message to Mary Price or Morgan Studer.

Over the next five Coffee Chats, we will be discussing Rachael Shah's Rewriting Partnerships: Community Perspectives on Community-Based Learning. During each meeting, participants will discuss a chapter of the book to enhance our community-academic partnership practice in teaching and engaged research. Join the group for one or multiple sessions.

About Rewriting Partnerships: Drawing on her background in composition, community writing, and literacy studies, Shah introduces the concept of Critical Community Based Epistemologies (CCBE) to wrestle with community knowledge in ways that invite us to reconsider our instructional design and assessment work centered on valuing the standpoints of marginalized participants and communities.  

The book draws on interviews with over 80 community members. Shah invites readers to reconsider knowledge making and expertise through CCBE approaches, which center teaching and inquiry on valuing the standpoints of marginalized participants as part of how we conceive, design, coordinate, and assess community-engaged learning.   

Shah uses CCBE approaches to engage with community knowledge across three common forms of community-engaged learning: 1) youth working with college students in a writing exchange program, 2) nonprofit staff who serve as clients for student projects, and 3) community members who work with graduate students. During our coffee chats, we'll build on her insights to examine our own practices and partnerships.

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