Coffee Chats

Coffee chats on community-engaged teaching and learning

Grab your favorite beverage and join colleagues and neighbors for timely, informal conversations devoted to community-engaged teaching and learning. Through our discussions, we’ll generate and respond to questions that impact us as educators, whole persons, and practitioner-scholars. We'll also get a chance to connect new people with shared interests, tapping into our collective wisdom and knowledge of the field.

Topics vary monthly. All are welcome. 

Want to suggest a topic or facilitate an upcoming coffee chat? Send a message to Mary Price or Morgan Studer.

  • Time: 10:30–11:30 a.m.
  • Description: The start of the new year provides each of us an opportunity to restart and recalibrate after a tough 2020. What does restart look like for you? What have we learned from 2020 about ourselves as educators, our students as whole people, and our partners as peers? What lessons can we take from our varied experiences to sustain ourselves and our commitments to community-engaged teaching this semester?
  • Register here

  • Time: 8:00–9:00 a.m.
  • Description: Community-engaged teaching practices like service learning place additional demands on educators that can lead to burnout. The work to create the powerful learning environments that are the hallmark of these learning methods demand additional time and attention (e.g., course and project planning, developing and sustaining trusting relationships with lay people, community groups and professionals; facilitating reflective learning; responding to unforeseen developments demanding spontaneous problem-solving). How do you address burnout in your own work-life? What have you learned about resilience from your community colleagues and students? What keeps you involved in community-engaged teaching? If you could ask for one change in your own work-life, what would it be?
  • Register here

  • Time: 10:30–11:30 a.m.
  • Description: The roots of service learning lie in a philosophy of education that views educating learners for lives of active participation in public life as central to the work of higher education. However, the word “service” in service learning can be polarizing, feeding into stereotypes and implicit biases about poor communities and communities of color, modeling structures of inequality as well as devaluing the legitimacy of academic work cast as “service.” In light of campus commitments to diversity, equity, and inclusion, is it time to replace the term “service” in service learning? How do you frame “service” in your teaching? What strategies do you use to prepare yourself, learners, and partners to disrupt these stereotypes conceptually and in how you collaborate?
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  • Time: 9:30–10:30 a.m.
  • Description: After a year’s experience of learning to navigate academic-community partnerships as part of online and hybrid courses, we each have learned myriad lessons. In what ways, if at all, has your view of the [in]compatibility of community-engaged teaching and learning shifted over this past year? What techniques, tools, and lessons do you plan to maintain in your tool kit once we return to face-to-face instruction? Which strategies have been most effective in supporting students learning with and from communities? What could the campus do to better to support educators in their learning partnerships with community groups?
  • Register here